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It's A Family Affair


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Bands Composed Mostly of Family Members

 Throughout the history of music there have been a many musical families who have added their influence to the ever evolving music scene of their respective eras, and during these earlier years it was pretty much a "Family Affair" . Music was usually centered around family get-togethers, spiritual, social, or political meetings, but if there was music being played in the household, the entire family was likely involved. Over the course of time the influence, and maybe even the importance of music has been diluted to some extent, but the family band is still alive and well and lending it's influence to todays music. Whether a brother/sister act such as the Allman Brothers, and the Wilson sisters of Heart, or a sextet like The Dooleys, the family that plays together, well, they might just get a recording contract. The following is a list of Family Music Acts that we thought of, and as usual, any asuggestions are welcome, and can be submitted Here.

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Allman Brothers

 

Allman Brothers Band is a Southern rock band based in Macon, Georgia, United States. The band was formed in Jacksonville, Florida in 1969 by brothers Duane Allman (slide guitar and lead guitar) and Gregg Allman (vocals, organ). While the band has been called the "principal architects of Southern rock", they also incorporate elements of blues-rock and hard rock, and their live shows have jam band-style improvisation and instrumental songs. In 1971, George Kimball of the Rolling Stone Magazine hailed them as "the best damn rock and roll band" of "the past five years." The band has been awarded eleven Gold and five Platinum albums between 1971 and 2005. Rolling Stone ranked them 52nd on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time in 2004. The band continues to record and tour to the present day.  'Artist Discography'

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Andrews Sisters were an American close harmony singing group, consisting of sisters LaVerne Sophia Andrews ( July 6, 1911–May 8, 1967), Maxene Angelyn Andrews ( January 3, 1916–October 21, 1995), and Patricia Marie Andrews ( born February 16, 1918). All were born in Minnesota to a Greek immigrant father and a Norwegian American mother. Modeling their career after the Boswell Sisters the Andrews Sisters were one of the most popular vocal groups of the 1940s and are synonymous with America's cultural awakening during World War II. Adept at swing, jazz, and pop, the Andrews Sisters' talents extended beyond the recording studio and concert halls to the big screen, as they appeared in numerous Hollywood features during their career. Tireless supporters of the war effort, the trio were well known for their work with the USO, entertaining troops throughout the 1940s. The sisters performed, as a group and as solo artisits, until LaVerne's death in 1967.  'Artist Discography'

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Boswell Sisters were a close harmony singing group, consisting of sisters Martha Boswell (June 9, 1905 – July 2, 1958), Connie Boswell (original name Connie) (December 3, 1907 – October 11, 1976), and Helvetia "Vet" Boswell (May 20, 1911 – November 12, 1988), noted for intricate harmonies and rhythmic experimentation. They attained national prominence in the USA in the 1930s. They were raised by a middle-class family on Camp Street in uptown New Orleans, Louisiana. Martha and Connie were born in Kansas City, Missouri. Helvetia was born in Birmingham, Alabama. (Connee's name was originally spelled Connie until she changed it in the 1940s.) They came to be well known in New Orleans while still in their early teens, making appearances in local theaters and radio. They made their first record for Victor Records in 1925. However, the Boswell Sisters did not attain national attention until they moved to New York City in 1930 and started making national radio broadcasts. After a few recordings with Okeh Records in 1930, they made numerous recordings for Brunswick Records from 1931-1935. These Brunswick records are widely regarded as milestone recordings of vocal jazz. Connee's ingenious reworking of the melodies and rhythms of popular songs, together with Glenn Miller's hot arrangements, and first rate New York jazz musicians (including The Dorsey Brothers, Benny Goodman, Bunny Berigan, Fulton McGrath, Joe Venuti, Arthur Schutt, Eddie Lang, Joe Tarto, Manny Klein, Dick McDonough, and Carl Kress), made these recordings unlike any others. Melodies were rearranged and slowed down, major keys were changed to minor keys (sometimes in mid-song) and rhythmic changes were par for the course. (Interestingly, they were among the very few performers who were allowed to make changes to current popular tunes. During this era, music publishers and record companies pressured performers not to alter current popular song arrangements). Connee also recorded a series of more conventional solo records for Brunswick during the same period. The name of their 1934 song "Rock and Roll" is an early use of the term. It is not one of their hotter numbers; it refers to "the rolling rocking rhythm of the sea".  'Artist Discography'

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Bee Gees

 

Bee Gees were a singing trio of brothers — Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb. The multiple award-winning group was successful for most of its forty years of recording music, but the trio had two distinct periods of exceptional success: as a harmonic "soft rock" act in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and as the foremost stars of the disco music era in the late 1970s. The group sang three-part tight harmonies that were instantly recognizable; brother Robin's clear vibrato lead was a hallmark of their earlier hits, while Barry's R&B falsetto became a signature sound during the disco years. The three brothers co-wrote most of their own hits, as well as writing and producing several major hits for other artists. Born on the Isle of Man to English parents, the family lived in various locales that included Chorlton-cum-Hardy, Manchester, England, United Kingdom and Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, where they began their musical careers. After early chart success in Australia, they returned to the United Kingdom where producer Robert Stigwood promoted them to a worldwide audience. It has been estimated that the Bee Gees' record sales total more than 200 million, making them one of the best-selling music artists of all time. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1997; fittingly, the presenter of the award to "Britain's first family of harmony" was Brian Wilson, historical leader of the Beach Boys, America's first family of rock harmony. Their Hall of Fame citation says "Only Elvis Presley, The Beatles, Michael Jackson, Garth Brooks and Paul McCartney have outsold the Bee Gees". Barry and Robin Gibb ended the group after forty-five years of activity, when Maurice suddenly died on January 12, 2003. 'Artist Discography'

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Bellamy Brothers are an American pop and country music duo composed of brothers David Milton Bellamy (born September 16, 1950) and Homer Howard Bellamy (born February 2, 1946), both from Darby, Florida, United States. The duo had considerable musical success in the 1970s and 1980s, starting with the release of their crossover hit "Let Your Love Flow" in 1976, a Number One single on the Billboard Hot 100. Starting in the late 1970s, the Bellamy Brothers found success in country music as well, charting twenty Number One singles and more than fifty hits overall on the country charts. To date, they have released more than forty albums, primarily on Curb Records. 'Artist Discography'

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Carter Family was a country music group that recorded between 1927 and 1956. Their music had a profound impact on bluegrass, country, southern gospel, pop and rock musicians as well as on the U.S. folk revival of the 1960s. They were the first vocal group to become country music stars. Their recordings of such songs as "Wabash Cannonball," "Will the Circle Be Unbroken," "Wildwood Flower" and "Keep On the Sunny Side" made them country standards. The original group consisted of Alvin Pleasant "A.P." Delaney Carter (1891-1960), his wife Sara Dougherty Carter (1898-1979), and his sister-in-law Maybelle Addington Carter (1909-1978). Maybelle was married to A.P.'s brother Ezra (Eck) Carter and was also Sara's first cousin. All three were born and raised in southwestern Virginia, where they were immersed in the tight harmonies of mountain gospel music and shape note singing. Maybelle's distinctive and innovative guitar playing style became a hallmark of the group.  'Artist Discography'

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Chapin Sisters

 

Chapin Sisters are an American folk pop musical group consisting of three sisters: Abigail and Lily Chapin, and Jessica Craven. Their music blends the harmonies of traditional sister-acts with a modern lyrical sensibility. "they haunt the interstices of folk, pop, and blues, and play seductive games with the knife-edge of heartache. Their soft harmonies and dark sidelong lyrics fit perfectly into a new folk aesthetic that is more twisted than freaky" ---popmatters.com.
Abigail and Lily are daughters of folk singer Tom Chapin and their half-sister Jessica Craven's father is director Wes Craven. The sisters grew up in New York, but it wasn't until 2004 when all three had relocated to Los Angeles that they began their band, at the urging of their brother, Jonathan Craven. They have appeared with Tom, Steve, and Jim Chapin at tribute concerts for their late uncle Harry Chapin, and have also toured nationally on their own. Their slow, acoustic version of Britney Spears' song "Toxic" gained attention and limited radio play. On March 18th, 2008 they released their debut full-length album Lake Bottom LP on the Plain Recordings label. 'Artist Discography'

 

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Chambers Brothers is a soul-music group, best known for its 1968 hit record, the 11-minute long song "Time Has Come Today". The group was part of the wave of new music that integrated American blues and gospel traditions with modern psychedelic and rock elements, spawning a heady mix integrating all these factors. Based on their Southern roots, the brothers brought a raw authenticity to their recordings and live performances that was missing from many other acts of that era. Their music has been kept alive through heavy use in film soundtracks. In the early 1960s these four brothers from Mississippi: Joe and Willie on guitar, Lester, on harmonica, and George on washtub bass would start to venture outside the gospel circuit, playing at coffeehouses that also booked folk acts. They played at places like The Ash Grove which was one of Los Angeles's most popular folk clubs and it became a favorite haunt of theirs and brought them into contact with Hoyt Axton, Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Reverend Gary Davis, and Barbara Dane. Dane became a great supporter of theirs. She played with the four brothers onstage and recording with the. She also took them on tour with her. It was her that got in touch with Pete Seeger and helped to arrange getting the Chambers Brothers on the bill of the 1965 Newport Folk Festival. One of their songs "I Got It" from their show appeared on Newport Folk Festival 1965 compilation LP that was issued on the Vanguard label. 'Artist Discography'

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Creedence Clearwater Revival (often abbreviated CCR) was an American rock band that gained popularity in the late 1960s and early 1970s with a number of successful singles drawn from various albums. The group consisted of lead vocalist, lead guitarist and primary lyricist John Fogerty, rhythm guitarist and brother of John, Tom Fogerty, bassist Stu Cook, and drummer Doug Clifford. Their musical style encompassed rock and roll and swamp rock genres. Despite their San Francisco Bay Area origins, they are sometimes also cited as southern rock stylists. CCR's music is still a staple of American and worldwide radio airplay and often figures in various media. 'Artist Discography'

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Cowsills were a singing group from Newport, Rhode Island specializing in what would later be defined as bubblegum pop. The band was formed in the spring of 1965 by four brothers—Barry, Bill, Bob, and John Cowsill. After their initial success, the brothers were later joined by their siblings Susan and Paul and their mother Barbara. Bob's twin brother Richard did not sing with the group, but he did serve as a road manager. Originally inspired by the Everly Brothers and later The Beatles, The Cowsills' musical interest started while their father Bud Cowsill was stationed in Canton, Ohio in the late 1950s as a US Navy recruiter. Billy and Bob taught themselves how to play the guitar. The boys developed their musical talent and harmonized vocals, and they performed at school church dances in Stark County, Ohio. The boys' first television appearance was on the Gene Carroll Show on WEWS in Cleveland.  'Artist Discography'

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The Dooleys

 

Dooleys were a United Kingdom male–female pop group comprising eight members—six of them family members—at their peak. They achieved several chart hits between 1977 and 1981. The group began in the late 1960s as "The Dooley Family", comprised of brothers Jim (vocals), John (guitar & vocals) and Frank (guitar & vocals) with sisters Marie, Anne & Kathy (all vocals). Based in Ilford, Essex, the group's work was mostly limited to theatres and hotels because the three youngest members were still at school and therefore not allowed to perform in pubs. In the summer of 1977 (almost a decade after they were formed) The Dooleys had their first hit with "Think I'm Gonna Fall in Love With You". The existing members of the family were joined in the summer of 1978 by the youngest member of the group, Helen (keyboards). Subsequent UK hits gave them the record of being the largest family act ever featured on a hit single. A string of hits followed with varying degrees of success, and they traveled around Europe and the Far East as one of the busiest live acts around. 'Artist Discography'

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Everly Brothers, Don Everly, and Phil Everly, are top-selling country-influenced rock and roll performers, known for steel-string guitar playing and close harmony singing. The Everlys are the most successful U.S. rock and roll duo on the Hot 100. Their greatest period came between 1957 and 1964. The brothers are both guitarists and use a simple vocal harmony mostly based on parallel thirds. With this, each line can often stand on its own as a melody line. This is in contrast to classic harmony lines which, while working well alongside the melody, sound strange by themselves. One example of their close-harmony is "Devoted to You". The duo's harmony singing had a strong influence on rock and roll groups of the 1960s. The Beatles, The Beach Boys, and Simon and Garfunkel developed their early singing style by performing Everly covers. The Beatles based the vocal arrangement of "Please Please Me" upon "Cathy's Clown."   'Artist Discography'

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Heart is a rock band whose founding members came from Seattle, Washington, USA in the early 1970s. Going through several lineup changes, the only constant members of the group are sisters Ann and Nancy Wilson. The group rose to fame in the 1970s with their music being influenced by hard rock as well as folk music. After diminishing in popularity by the mid-1980s, the band created a major comeback in 1985, experiencing further success with their power ballads throughout the rest of the decade. By the mid-1990s, Heart left their 1980s' sound and went back to their hard rock roots which they continue to play today. They have sold over 30 million albums worldwide. Heart was ranked #57 on VH1's "100 Greatest Artists of Hard Rock".  'Artist Discography'

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Isley Brothers are a Grammy-winning African-American R&B and soul music group. They are one of the few groups to have long-running success on the Billboard charts placing a charted single in every decade since 1959 and as of 2006 were still charting successful albums performing under a repertoire of doo-wop, R&B, rock 'n' roll, soul, funk, disco, urban adult contemporary and hip-hop soul. The group has had a variation of lineups, ranging from a quartet to a trio to a sextet to finally a duo. Originally raised in Cincinnati, Ohio, the original group consisted of the three elder sons of O'Kelly Isley, Sr. and Sally Bell Isley: O'Kelly Jr., Rudy and Ronnie, who formed in 1957 and recorded with small labels singing doo-wop and rock 'n' roll. After modest success with singles such as "Shout", "Twist and Shout" and the Motown single, "This Old Heart of Mine (Is Weak for You)", and a brief tenure with Jimi Hendrix as a background guitar player, the group settled on a brand of gritty soul and funk defined by the Grammy-winning smash "It's Your Thing", in 1969. After reforming the group as a six-member lineup in 1973 featuring younger brothers Ernie and Marvin and brother-in-law Chris Jasper, they became known to fans as 3 + 3 and charted gold and platinum success with albums such as 3 + 3, The Heat Is On, Go For Your Guns and Between the Sheets, while charting a succession of hit singles such as "That Lady", "Fight the Power", "For the Love of You", "Don't Say Goodnight (It's Time For Love)" and "Between the Sheets", between 1973 and 1983. After the younger brothers splintered from the group in 1984, the remaining trio continued recording until Kelly's death from a cancer-related heart attack in 1986. Rudy left the group for a career in the ministry in 1989. In 1991, Ron reformed the group with Ernie and Marvin returning to the lineup. Since 1997, after diabetes forced Marvin into retirement, the lineup has been Ron and Ernie, now on hiatus due to Ron's current prison sentence after a tax evasion conviction in 2006.  'Artist Discography'

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Jackson family is an American family of musicians who originated in Gary, Indiana and later relocated to Encino, California. Performing as members of The Jackson 5 and as solo artists, the children of Joseph Walter and Katherine Esther Jackson influenced and shaped the sound of popular music. As a group, the eldest sons Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, Marlon, and Michael, set the family on a path of musical success that spread among siblings Rebbie, La Toya, Randy, and Janet. The acclaim of The Jackson 5 led the group to become known as the "First Family of Soul"; the continued success of Michael and Janet's careers as solo artists led the Jacksons to become known as the "Royal Family of Pop". Although the only child not to become famous is Joh'Vonnie Jackson the fourth and youngest sister. Members of the Jackson family have been the subject of heavily publicized controversies and legal imbroglios, most notably allegations of child abuse against Michael in 1993, his criminal trial in 2005, and Janet's controversial Super Bowl halftime performance in 2004. Some Jackson siblings have, at various times, publicly criticized one another and alleged abuse at the hands of their father. In spite of these circumstances and other troubles, the Jacksons have continued to be praised for shaping the world of entertainment with some of the siblings' own children taking the spotlight in various careers. In recent years, certain members of the family have been honored for their work: in 1997 The Jackson 5 were inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Michael would follow the group to the hall in 2001. In 2002, Joseph was acknowledged as "the best musical manager of all time" by the Hall in Cleveland. The Jacksons, Michael and Janet all received stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1980, 1984 and 1990 respectively. Michael died on June 25, 2009, just weeks before he was to begin a series of 50 comeback concerts.  'Artist Discography'

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Jonas Brothers are an American pop boy band. The band gained its popularity from the Disney Channel children's television network. From Wyckoff, New Jersey, the band consists of three brothers: Kevin Jonas, Joe Jonas, and Nick Jonas. In the summer of 2008, they starred in the Disney Channel Original Movie Camp Rock. The band has released four albums: It's About Time, Jonas Brothers, A Little Bit Longer, and Lines, Vines and Trying Times. In 2008, the group was nominated for the Best New Artist award at the 51st Grammy Awards and won the award for Breakthrough Artist at the American Music Awards. To this date they have sold over eight million albums worldwide. 'Artist Discography'

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The Judds

 

 

 

Judds were a Grammy Award-winning American country music duo composed of Naomi Judd and her daughter, Wynonna. The Judds signed with RCA Records in 1983 and were one of the most popular country music duos of the decade, recording more than ten studio albums and charting many hit singles on the Billboard Hot Country Singles (now Hot Country Songs) charts, including fourteen Number Ones. From 1984, every album was a collaboration with producer Brent Maher and the prolific Nashville musician Don Potter. In 1991, Naomi was forced to retire due to health reason and shortly afterward Wynonna embarked on a solo career. On her own, Wynonna charted five more Number One singles on the country music charts, and recorded multiple albums. She and Naomi briefly reunited in 1999 and 2000, charting one last single credited to The Judds, as well as receiving a Academy of Country Music nomination for Duo of the Year in 2001. In addition, Naomi sang harmony on Wynonna's 2004 single "Flies on the Butter (You Can't Go Home Again)", although this song was credited as "Wynonna with Naomi Judd". In 1998, The Judds appeared in a commercial for the retail chain Kmart, performing as the Judds on the song "Changing For the Better". In 2008, The Judds once again reunited for a concert at the 2008 Stagecoach Festival in Indio, California as well as two shows in Canada, including one at the world famous 'Calgary Stampede' and another at the Merritt Mountain Music Festival in Merritt, BC. In 2009, Naomi joined Wynonna at the CMA Music Festival in Nashville, TN to perform as The Judds.  'Artist Discography'

 

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Lennon Sisters are a singing group consisting of four siblings: Dianne (born December 1, 1939), Peggy (born April 8, 1941), Kathy (born August 2, 1943), and Janet (born June 15, 1946). They were all born in Los Angeles, California. The original quartet were the eldest four in a family of twelve siblings. In 1992, younger sister Mimi replaced second sister Peggy who retired. Sister Diane (DeeDee) has also retired. The group were a regular on the weekly television show, The Lawrence Welk Show. The current group line-up, appearing mostly at Welk resorts, consists of Mimi, Janet and Kathy. The quartet debuted on The Lawrence Welk Show on Christmas Eve 1955 after their school classmate, Larry Welk, son of Lawrence Welk, brought them to the attention of his father. Mr. Welk was home, sick in bed, when his son brought the sisters in to sing for him. He was so impressed he picked up the phone and booked them for that week's show. Their immediate and immense popularity was due not only to their beautiful harmonies, but to their natural charm and genuine sweetness as well. They were a mainstay on the show until they left to start a career of their own in 1968. The quartet was only three members from 1960 to 1964; oldest sister Dianne (also called Dee Dee) got married, left the group, and then rejoined them. Peggy sang the high harmony part, Kathy the low harmony, and Janet and Dianne sang the middle harmony and lead parts. Their first hit, "Tonight, You Belong to Me" reached to #15 on the charts in 1956. This was followed by their 1961 single, "Sad Movies (Make Me Cry)", which turned out to be their highest-charting record. It provided them with the only number #1 single of their career, reaching the top of the charts in Japan.  'Artist Discography'

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Maddox Brothers and Rose

 

Maddox Brothers and Rose, known as America’s Most Colorful Hillbilly Band from the 1930s to the 1950s, consisted of four brothers, Fred, Cal, Cliff and Don Maddox with their sister Rose. Cliff died in 1949 and was replaced by brother Henry. The family hailed from Boaz, Alabama, but rode the rails and hitch hiked to California in 1933 when the band members were still children, following the failed efforts of their sharecropper parents during the early part of the Depression. They were a little in advance of the flood of Okies who were to flood the state in the 30s. They struggled to make a living as itinerant fruit and vegetable pickers following the harvest as far north as Washington state, and as far east as Arizona, as well as in the San Joaquin Valley. They often worked from dawn to dusk, sleeping and eating on the ground. Having settled in Modesto, the family developed their musical ability and, in 1937 performed on the radio, sponsored by a local furniture store. From 1946-1951 the group recorded for 4 Star Records (Hollywood), then for Columbia Records. Some 4 Star masters were leased and released by US.-Decca Records at the beginning of the 1950s. The following quotes are from Rose Maddox. "We were called hillbilly singers - not country - then. No, none of this country music then. People just called us hillbilly... People tell me that I was one of the first women to sing what I sang - country boogie. I guess I was. There was no rock 'n' roll in those early days, before 1955. Only country boogie. My brothers also played that way. We called it country then." Hillbilly Swing, Hillbilly Boogie, and Okie Boogie are terms that have also been used to describe the type of music played by this group. The Maddox's material ranged from the country standards of Hank Williams and Merle Travis, cowboy songs, to the Western Swing of Bob Wills, to old-time, folk, and church singing, to Jazz, Swing, Boogie Woogie and even a taste of early Rock and Roll. 'Artist Discography'

 

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Mills Brothers were a major African-American jazz and pop vocal quartet of the 20th century producing more than 2,000 recordings that sold more than 50 million copies and garnered at least three dozen gold records. The Mills Brothers were inducted into The Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 1998. The group was originally composed of four brothers ; John Jr. (October 19, 1910 - January 23, 1936), Herbert (April 2, 1912 - April 12, 1989), Harry (August 19, 1913 - June 28, 1982), and Donald (April 29, 1915 - November 13, 1999).  Their first record for Brunswick, a cover of the Original Dixieland Jass Band standard "Tiger Rag" became a nationwide seller. Other hits followed -- "Goodbye Blues", their theme song, "You're Nobody's Sweetheart Now", "Ole Rockin' Chair", "Lazy River", "How'm I Doin'", and others. They remained on Brunswick until late 1934, when they signed with Decca, where they stayed well into the 1950s. On all of their Brunswick records, as well as the early Decca's, the label always stated: "No musical instruments or mechanical devices used in this recording other than one guitar"
  They were a sensation on CBS in 1930-1931, particularly when they co-starred on the widely popular The Fleischmann's Yeast Hour hosted by Rudy Vallee. They had their own popular radio series in 1932-1933, one of the earliest built around a black act, billed as the "Four Boys and a Guitar". Before their show announcers commonly explained to listeners that the only instrument was a guitar, as the vocal effects made many listeners think they were hearing a muted trumpet, saxophone, and string bass. The Mills Brothers were sponsored by some of the largest advertisers in early radio; Standard Oil, Procter & Gamble, Crisco, and Crosley Radio. They began appearing in films. Their first, The Big Broadcast (Paramount Pictures, 1932) was an all-star radio revue that included Bing Crosby, Cab Calloway, and the Boswell Sisters. In 1934, the Brothers starred with Crosby for Woodbury Soap, and recorded their classics "Lazy Bones", "Sweet Sue", "Lulu's Back in Town", "Bye-Bye Blackbird", "Sleepy Head", and "Shoe Shine Boy". Their film appearances included Twenty Million Sweethearts (Warner Brothers, 1934) and Broadway Gondolier, (Warner Brothers, 1935). In 1934, The Mills Brothers became the first African-Americans to give a command performance before British royalty. They performed at the Regal Theatre for a special audience: King George V, Queen Mary, and their mother. 'Artist Discography'

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Nelson is a glam metal band founded by Matthew and Gunnar Nelson (the twin sons of Ricky Nelson). They had a No. 1 hit in the United States with "(Can't Live Without Your) Love and Affection" during the week of September 29, 1990. They are listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the only family to reach number one record status in three successive generations (beginning with grandparents Ozzie and Harriet Nelson). The band split with Geffen Records record label after 1995, but they have continued to produce and release albums independently under their label, Stone Canyon Records. However, they have yet to revisit the level of success they experienced during their 1990 debut. Raised in a musical family, Matthew and Gunnar Nelson were always involved in music. In the early 1980s, they joined a band called Strange Agents. Later that decade, they put together their own band and got a recording contract with Geffen Records. Their debut album, 1990's After the Rain, was a success, and the band went on tour to support it. The album produced the No. 1 hit "(Can't Live Without Your) Love and Affection." Following that tour, the band immersed itself in the recording of their next project. The result was a harder and heavier concept album called Imaginator. However, when they played the album for Geffen, the label considered it too heavy. According to Nelson members, Geffen even threatened to drop the band from the label if they did not produce another record more to their tastes. The band spent another year recording another album called Because They Can. The label finally approved and released it in 1995. Still, the pop music landscape had undergone a dramatic change in the five years following After the Rain, and Geffen chose not to promote the new album and quickly dropped Nelson entirely from its roster. The Nelson brothers then set up their own label, Stone Canyon Records, and released Imaginator in 1996. Despite not receiving the same level of success in the United States, the band has been a consistent seller in Japan. With their label, they have released four other albums, including a tribute to their father. As of Spring 2008, Nelson has become featured band on the Royal Caribbean Cruise Ship Circuit, playing on Brilliance of the Seas among other ships. They performed for the sixth-consecutive year in Epcot's Flower Power Concert Series as part of the annual International Flower & Garden Festival.  'Artist Discography'

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Neville brothers

 

Neville Brothers, an American R&B and Soul group, was formed in 1977 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The group dates back to 1976, when the four brothers of the Neville family, Art, Charles, Aaron, and Cyril got together to take part in the recording session of The Wild Tchoupitoulas, a Mardi Gras Indian group lead by their uncle Big Chief Jolly. This experience lead them to form the group the following year. Their debut album was released from Capitol Records in 1978. In 1988, the group released Uptown from EMI featuring guests including Branford Marsalis, Keith Richards and Carlos Santana. The following year saw the release of Yellow Moon from A&M Records produced by Daniel Lanois. The track "Healing Chant" from that album won best pop instrumental performance of the Grammy Awards. Due to the health problems of Art Neville, the band kept low profile in the late 1990s onto the early 2000s, however, they made a comeback in 2004 with album Walkin' In The Shadow Of Life from Back Porch Records, their first newly recorded effort in 5 years. All brothers except Charles who lived in Massachusetts, had been living in New Orleans, but suffering damages from Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Cyril and Aaron moved out of the city afterwards. They had not been performing in New Orleans since Katrina hit the city, however, they finally returned to perform there at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival in 2008, at the closing spot which had been reserved for them for years. Ivan Neville, Aaron's son on keyboards plays with the band off and on in the recent years. 'Artist Discography'

 

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Osmonds are an American family music group with a long and varied career that took them from singing barbershop music as children, to achieving success as teen-music idols, to producing a hit television show, and to continued success as solo and group performers. The Osmonds are devout Mormons, and their religious values have had a tremendous effect on their careers. The group originally consisted of brothers Alan Osmond, Wayne Osmond, Merrill Osmond, and Jay Osmond. They were later joined by younger siblings Donny Osmond, Marie Osmond, and Jimmy Osmond. Older brothers George Virl Osmond, Jr. (Virl) and Tom Osmond were born deaf and did not originally perform, although they later made occasional appearances, most notably on the family Christmas specials from the 70s. Despite the ups and downs of a career in show business and religious values that did not fit with the popular perception of pop-music stars, the Osmonds achieved remarkable success. They still perform with various line-ups and as soloists. 'Artist Discography'

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Pointer Sisters

 

 

Pointer Sisters are an American Pop/R&B recording act from Oakland, California that achieved mainstream success during the 1970s and 1980s. Spanning over three decades together, their repertoire has included such diverse genres as pop music, disco, jazz, bebop, blues, country, soul, funk, dance, new wave and rock. The group had its early origins when sisters June and Bonnie Pointer began performing in 1969 (without a record deal) as "Pointers, a Pair". The line-up grew to a quartet when Anita Pointer joined, followed by Ruth, who joined in December, 1972, right before they recorded their debut album. They achieved their greatest commercial success later as a trio consisting of Anita, June, and Ruth, after Bonnie left the group to commence a solo career.  'Artist Discography'

 

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Smothers Brothers are an American music-and-comedy team, consisting of the brothers Tom ("Tommy") and Dick Smothers. The brothers' trademark act was performing folk songs (Tommy on acoustic guitar, Dick on string bass), which usually led to arguments between the siblings. Tommy's signature line was, "Mom always liked you best!" Tommy (the elder of the two) acted "slow," and Dick, the straight man, acted "superior." In the 1960s, the brothers frequently appeared on television variety shows and issued several popular record albums of their stage performances. Their own television variety show, The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, became one of the most influential and controversial American TV programs of the Vietnam War era, due to being very politically left. Despite popular success, the brothers' penchant for material that was critical of the political mainstream (and sympathetic to the emerging counterculture) led to their program's cancellation by the CBS network in 1969. The brothers continued to work, both independently and as a team, on stage, on television and in films during subsequent decades. They continue to tour the country as the longest-lived comedy team in history; 2008 marked their 50th year performing together.  'Artist Discography'

 

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